Making eMail excellent: A long-overdue rethink and a much anticipated application

Email client applications are all much of a muchness; some do more than others with tagging, highlighting and rules, but in the main they ultimately allow you to read email.

From a ‘Getting Things Done‘ (GTD) perspective, email has been the one ‘inbox’ (in the sense of GTD) that has been incongruous to the rest in my system; I’ve found it really difficult to smoothly integrate emails in my inbox into my GTD workflow.

How to: Communicate your plans effectively with Short Calendar


Email can be a terrible way to communicate. One such occasion is when trying to communicate planned time. As Nathan Cahill puts it:

“Plans are not easy to communicate over email. Whether you are planning a short trip or having a relative visit, you need to write it in calendar format.”

Logo for the Short Calendar web service - stylised drawing of a calendar

And, fortunately for the rest of us, he went ahead and created Short Calendar, a web app that allows you to do just that – create your plan on a calendar and email it to whoever you need to.

Simple, free. Excellent.

Thanks to Brent Sordyl, who’s blog post brought this service to my attention.

GTD + Evernote = The Secret Weapon

I happened across Berin’s blog by way of WordPress’s “Read Blogs” feature. This is an interesting post on how he uses Evernote to manage getting things done; the “The Secret Weapon” system that he mentions and links to is something I’m going to take a good look at in the near future.

I’ve started to compile a list of different users’ Evernote filing and tagging techniques, and I hope to post my findings here in due course.

Why I moved back to Wunderlist

This post has been prompted a (short) Twitter conversation between myself and Craig Jarrow.

The story starts a little over 2 weeks before that conversation, when I went the other way. I had been toying with WunderKit but not getting any serious use out of it, so I spent some of my weekend moving my task lists and tasks into WunderKit. I was going to ditch Wunderlist and work exclusively from the new kid on the block.

The Wunderlist and Wunderkit application icons in a Mac dock

Wunder-full apps

One of the major drivers for the transfer to Wunderkit was to try and work out what Wunderkit actually is. Is it a replacement for Wunderlist? Is it a replacement for BaseCamp? Both? Neither? I was imagining it as a replacement for some or all of my other GTD and project management tools. (I now know better – read on.)