Gwen Hernandez’ online Scrivener training courses

Gwen Hernandez, author of romance novels and scrivener expert user (she wrote “Scrivener for Dummies” and “Productivity tools for writers: An introduction to free and low-cost programs that help you organize, prioritize, and focus“), has announced a new batch of online training courses for 2014.

They are:

  • Scrivener I: The Basics and Beyond (Mac & Windows), September 8-24
  • Scrivener II: Intermediate and Advanced Concepts (Mac & Windows), October 14-30
  • Scrivener Master Course: Compile (Mac & Windows), December 8-17

These courses are designed to lead from novice to expert and are traditionally well received by those who participate. They are also great value for money, so check them out.

Ady

 

Excellent post – Markdown workflows for scrivener, blogging and Evernote

I just came across this excellent post – “MY **MARKDOWN** WORKFLOWS FOR SCRIVENER, BLOGGING AND EVERNOTE” – on the Hunting Down Writing blog. It’s both excellent and thorough and I urge Scrivener and Evernote users to check it out. I’ve had difficulty working out how best to use markdown as my default formatting method and the workflows presented here are great.

Ady

I’m curating a whole host of Scrivener-related resources here. Please pop by and take a look.

Scrivener Resources page updated

It’s only been live a few days, but already my Scrivener Resources page has received a lot of interest – thanks for coming by to take a look! I’ve just added a few more interesting blog posts and sites to the page so, even if you’ve already taken a look, please revisit.

I welcome comments about the selection and, if you have any choice scrivener sites that you think I should include, please let me know via the comments section on the page.

Scrivener and the Editing Process

I’ve stumbled across two fantastic blog posts over the last couple of days – both about Scrivener’s place in the editing process.

David Hewson’s post argues the case for dumping Scrivener and using Word; Jamie Todd Rubin’s post describes how he manages edits in Scrivener.

I think both cases are valid: David’s is argued from the point of view that editors will invariably use Word; Jamie’s from the point of view of someone who understands this, but would rather manage the whole process in Scrivener.

The example Jamie cites is for a 12 scene work; his process of copying from Word into Scrivener seems viable for a work of this size. David’s example has over 100 scenes and I wouldn’t want to be copying and pasting between the applications for a work of that magnitude.

What do you think about these two different approaches to the editing process? What do you do? Please feel free to leave a comment.

I’m curating a whole host of Scrivener-related resources here. Please pop by and take a look.