Scrivener Resources page updated

It’s only been live a few days, but already my Scrivener Resources page has received a lot of interest – thanks for coming by to take a look! I’ve just added a few more interesting blog posts and sites to the page so, even if you’ve already taken a look, please revisit.

I welcome comments about the selection and, if you have any choice scrivener sites that you think I should include, please let me know via the comments section on the page.

Trying the “Get Noticed!” theme

Apologies for the appearance of the blog – I’m updating to a new theme – “Get Noticed!” – and whilst in transition some of the look and feel will undoubtedly be a little poor.

I hope that this will resolve itself very quickly!

Famous Authors’ Handwritten Outlines

Outline for “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix”, by JK Rowling. [Via Chandler Baker]. Click the image to view her original.

I came across this post on the Flavorwire site showing a number of authors’ Outlines for their novels. I find it interesting to see both the similarities and differences between the various examples.

Personally, if I wasn’t outlining electronically, I would go for the spreadsheet-like format (although it only gives you 2 degrees of freedom, I wouldn’t be able to cope with a looser organisation). I’d be interested in seeing how some of these would look electronically – Scapple and Aeon Timeline would be my choices.

Scrivener and the Editing Process

I’ve stumbled across two fantastic blog posts over the last couple of days – both about Scrivener’s place in the editing process.

David Hewson’s post argues the case for dumping Scrivener and using Word; Jamie Todd Rubin’s post describes how he manages edits in Scrivener.

I think both cases are valid: David’s is argued from the point of view that editors will invariably use Word; Jamie’s from the point of view of someone who understands this, but would rather manage the whole process in Scrivener.

The example Jamie cites is for a 12 scene work; his process of copying from Word into Scrivener seems viable for a work of this size. David’s example has over 100 scenes and I wouldn’t want to be copying and pasting between the applications for a work of that magnitude.

What do you think about these two different approaches to the editing process? What do you do? Please feel free to leave a comment.

I’m curating a whole host of Scrivener-related resources here. Please pop by and take a look.

CorneliOS – A Framework for Building Community Platforms

Thanks to SourceForge’s Facebook timeline, I just discovered CorneliOS. From their blurb:

The CorneliOS WebOS is an easy-to-use and cross-browser “Web Desktop Environment”, “Web Operating System” or “Web Office”. It’s also a powerful web application framework that can be used to build community platforms.

Here’s a link to the CorneliOS web OS & application framework.

Making eMail excellent: A long-overdue rethink and a much anticipated application

Email client applications are all much of a muchness; some do more than others with tagging, highlighting and rules, but in the main they ultimately allow you to read email.

From a ‘Getting Things Done‘ (GTD) perspective, email has been the one ‘inbox’ (in the sense of GTD) that has been incongruous to the rest in my system; I’ve found it really difficult to smoothly integrate emails in my inbox into my GTD workflow.