Excellent post – Markdown workflows for scrivener, blogging and Evernote

I just came across this excellent post – “MY **MARKDOWN** WORKFLOWS FOR SCRIVENER, BLOGGING AND EVERNOTE” – on the Hunting Down Writing blog. It’s both excellent and thorough and I urge Scrivener and Evernote users to check it out. I’ve had difficulty working out how best to use markdown as my default formatting method and the workflows presented here are great.

Ady

I’m curating a whole host of Scrivener-related resources here. Please pop by and take a look.

Final word on the Delicious WordPress Widget

So, this will be my last word on the subject. To be honest, nothing’s changed since my last post; I’ve had nothing back from Avos regarding the support question I raised, and so I continue to incorporate my Delicious links into my blog template using the RSS feed.

The one thing that would resolve the issue would be for WordPress to update the Delicious widget to use the V2 API, which works perfectly in the new Avos system, rather then the V1 API, which Avos have not maintained across the purchase. I’m not holding my breath, but hope that something will be done here.

Of course, now that I’m using an RSS feed, there’s no reason for me to continue with Delicious at all, and I could just as easily switch to an RSS feed from my Pinboard bookmarks instead.

WordPress Delicious widget work-around

This is part 3 of a seemingly never-ending saga which started here and continued here.

OK, I bit the bullet, removed the Delicious widget and replaced it with a plain-old RSS one. (Thanks to Andy Extance for trying it.) After a bit of CSS jiggery-pokery it almost looks the same as the original. For my RSS feed the URL is: http://feeds.delicious.com/v2/rss/adycoles. Replace the last bit with your Delicious username and you’re good-to-go.

However, I’m not satisfied and intend to pursue the loss of JSON feed (which the Delicious widget relies on).

These are a few of my favourite feeds

At the last count, I subscribe to nearly 140 RSS feeds. Admittedly, quite a few of these are notification feeds from project management and software development applications, but the vast majority are blog-based.

I use NewNewsWire to read my blogs (Apple only – sorry, D0nny), and I link it up to Google Reader (not compulsory) so that I can read subscriptions on my iPad, too (using FlipBoard). I tend to skim through the titles of new posts and then read the preview of those that interest me. If it’s really worth reading past the preview I’ll either read it there-and-then, or stick it in Delicious and Pinboard as research or reference material.

I thought I’d share some of my favourite blogs. ‘Favourite’ is a difficult thing to quantify, as my reading is quite diverse and what makes one blog better than another is difficult to pin down, if indeed possible. So here are my top 10 blogs, based on the number of articles that get to the final stage of being read and/or bookmarked – a statistic that is really easy to get from NetNewsWire:

(All title links lead to the blogs’ home pages.)

1. The Wall

“Social, marketing, media: Blogged”. The Wall is part of Brand Republic. The vast majority of the stuff I read from here is social media related. It’s a UK production aimed at marketing, media and comms industries. They have a large and varied selection of contributors and I find that I’m usually ‘in tune’ with their opinions.

2. Think Vitamin

“A Blog for Web practitioners Designed, Built and Curated by Carsonified”. Aimed pretty much exclusively at the development community. Lots of good stuff, though they are pushing their members-only content quite a lot. Curated by Paul Boag and Ryan Carson, amongst others, so quality is the order of the day.

3. Simply Zesty

“Online PR & Social Media”. Lots of interesting articles around the major social media / networking companies, along with info about advertising / marketing campaigns making use of social media. I’m not selling it well – it’s really good!

4. O’Reilly radar

“Insight, analysis, and research about emerging technologies”. Number 4 on my most read list. I really like their daily “Four short links” posts highlighting ‘interesting elsewhere’ articles.

5. Smashing Magazine

Design (print, online, anywhere) and Coding. Lots of good stuff about UX, UI and mobile. Plus, every month they have a desktop wallpaper calendar post in which designers put forward desktop wallpapers for download. Some great inspirational stuff and loads of useful insights, tips, tricks & techniques.

6. PublicTechnology.net

“PublicTechnology.net is the news and analysis resource for ICT leaders in the UK public sector.” (original emphasis). A must-read for me. Lots of interesting, mainly work-related stuff.

=7. The Public-i Blog

“… the place where we talk about what we do.” This is somewhat unfairly down at number 7, as I read every post – there’s just not as many of them as there are on, say, The Wall or Think Vitamin. This is my company blog, so it’s pretty much expected that I’ll read it. That said, it’s an interesting read. If you want to know what Public-i does, then this is where you want to start.

=7. Curiouscatherine’s Blog

“Thinking about using the social web to do democratic things…..”. Catherine’s blog comes in equal 7th in the Ady’s most visited blogs top 10. Again this is very unfair (on Catherine) – I read every post. Admittedly I understand about 1 in 10, but that’s not the point. Mainly based around her PhD work, the blog continues to show how far down the intelligence scale I actually reside. Excellent analysis of where online meets offline and formal meets informal, along with identity, privacy, co-production.

9. Time Management Ninja

“Helping you win the battle against wasted time, disorganization, and all other things evil…”. This is one of many time management / GTD type blogs I subscribe to, and is the most read. (And the one I’ve commented on the most.) Craig’s posts are excellent: sometimes challenging, sometimes obvious (after the fact), always worth reading if, like me, you get a buzz from time management.

10. Carl’s Notepad

“Thoughts and observations on the world around me”. Carl Haggerty is the Digital Communications Manager at Devon County Council. I made his acquaintance through work, started reading his blog and have found it to be a great read. Again, this doesn’t deserve to be in 10th position, as I read most, if not all, of Carl’s posts.

So there you go. My top 10 most read blogs. This time next week it’ll probably have all changed. It’s a very small percentage of the number of blogs I subscribe to, so I hope to highlight some of the others, which are just as interesting, in future posts.

WordPress re-vamps networking calls-to-action

A timely change to the like/share/rate section of our blogs. The more clean and tidy approach will, I hope, increase their use.

Nice one.

Making your posts more beautiful Here at WordPress.com we care about making things look good. Automattic, Inc., our parent company, invests heavily in design: every engineering team has a full-time designer. We know making things look and feel great is important  and we love making things people love to use. Over the last few weeks we’ve studied the most popular features people add to their blogs. Things like Sharing, Likes and Ratings. Previously when you turned them on it made … Read More

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GWD: Getting Writing Done

Over the years I’ve tried many methods and tools to help me do things better. Most recently I’ve been concentrating on ‘Getting Things Done’ (GTD), which I’ve found to be very beneficial in managing my time (and, well, getting things done). I use the Pomodoro technique to time box my activities during the working day and use tools such as Evernote and Flipboard to manage my thoughts and information streams.

Where I’ve not yet found a suitable solution is when it comes to writing. And here I mean medium-to-large, structured documents, be they blog posts, reports or whatever. Up until now I have been using mind maps to help organise my thoughts but I find that I tend to become trapped in the structure I originally lay these thoughts down in. I’ve been looking for something more specific to the writing process and have discovered Scrivener.

I initially gravitated towards Scrivener because of its separation of content and format, the benefit being that you can concentrate on the words and structure of the document without unnecessary formatting getting in the way. It also has a full screen mode whereby you can completely immerse yourself in the job at hand without distraction, though this, along with pretty much everything else, is completely customisable.

I’m very impressed with the User Manual that comes with the application – I’ve nearly read it end-to-end and will have to go back and re-read some of it, but it’s easy to locate specific information, and so works well as a reference.

The range of formatting available is also comprehensive; it comes with a number of templates for screenplays, scripts, and a host of other formats; and can output in HTML, RTF, for input into other writing / publishing applications, and also ebook and mobi formats for iPad/Kindle etc. And, obviously, you can modify existing templates or create your own.

As of now, I don’t have a lot of experience with it, so I may be singing it’s praises a little too early, but I’ve started a couple of projects with it and I am finding it a lot better than previous methods I’ve used. I’ve installed the Index Card app on my iPad and have been synchronising my writing across to it when I’m away from my laptop computer – great for train journeys – and this is working well for me.

Scrivener is a Mac-only application (beta versions for windows/linux here), so it’s not going to be the solution for everyone, but I’m hopeful that it’s the solution for me.

Update – 17th August 2011

There’s a follow-up post here with the results of my first end-to-end use of scrivener.

Ady

 

We All Like to Reblog (via WordPress.com News)

Cool new feature added to WordPress.com sites. Will definitely help to support viral broadcast alongside other social networking methods.

We All Like to Reblog Have you ever come across a blog post that you enjoyed so much you wanted to easily share it with the readers of your own blog? Sure, you can copy and paste the link and perhaps even a snippet of text with your own comments, but overall it's not a particularly enjoyable experience. We wanted to change this and make sharing other posts with your readers as easy as posting to your blog. Today we're introducing a new like and reblog feature enabled … Read More

via WordPress.com News